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Beaneath Old Roof Trees
Introduction

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BENEATH OLD ROOF TREES

BY
ABRAM ENGLISH BROWN

AUTHOR OF "HISTORY OF BEDFORD" "BEDFORD OLD FAMILIES"
"GLIMPSES OF OLD NEW ENGLAND LIFE"
AND "FLAG OF THE MINUTE-MEN"

BOSTON
LEE AND SHEPARD PUBLISHERS
10 MILK STREET
1896

TO

THE SOCIETIES ORGANIZED TO PERPETUATE THE

HONOR OF THE BRAVE MEN AND WOMEN,

THROUGH WHOSE SACRIFICES

THE AMERICAN COLONIES OBTAINED THEIR FREEDOM,

This Volume

IS GRATEFULLY INSCRIBED
The Author


Page vii

PREFATORY NOTES

"WHAT DID THEY HAVE TO DO WITH IT?"

     WHILE speaking on the battlefield at Lexington with tourists from the city of Philadelphia, allusion was incidentally made to other towns than those usually mentioned in this connection; whereupon I was at once politely met with the honest inquiry, "What did they have to do with it?"
     My object in this volume is to answer that question, showing in a story-like manner the part taken by many towns in the opening events of the Revolution.
     In offering this work to the public, I desire to acknowledge gratefully the sources from which aid has been obtained ; but they have been so numerous that I refrain from mentioning any published works, lest I may inadvertently omit some.
     Manuscript records of towns and churches have been freely consulted through the courtesy of their custodians to whom I am indebted. The many interviews with venerable men and women herein recorded have been to me occasions of great pleasure, and I trust will result in lasting benefit to all who peruse these pages.


Page viii

     This volume being one of a prospective series, "Footprints of the Patriots," treats of only a small portion of the towns identified with the opening Revolution.
     It is my purpose to consider the other towns as they appear in the widening circle from which came the ready response to the memorable alarm.
     If the reader shall be aroused to a keener appreciation of the cost of our national heritage, and to a higher standard of citizenship beneath its star-spangled emblem, the work will not have been in vain.
     With that hope for an impelling motive in the future as it has been in the past, I remain the friend of the reader.
ABRAHAM ENGLISH BROWN


"'Tis like a dream when one awakes,
This vision of the scenes of old;
'Tis like the moon when morning breaks;
'Tis like a tale round watchfires told."

     "Surely that people is happy to whom the noblest story in history has come down through father and mother, and by the unbroken traditions of their own firesides." --SENATOR GEORGE F. HOAR, Oration at Plymouth, December, 1895

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